Why did I change my mind about open data?

Knowledge against fear and suspicion – open data is beneficial

Generally disagreeing about any kind of data sharing, I realized my behavior was mostly based on fear. Fear is a major impediment to anything innovative and to any kind of change. Why did I change my mind about open data? It is about differentiating between public and private data, and about the fact that data made public are first of all edited.

New work – new ideas

In November 2015, I started working at Liip and I had a lot of new projects and inputs. The core of my work is the same, I completely changed field though. I stand now in the middle of a flow of innovative ideas and energy, which is very motivating and helps me be constantly open-minded.
One of my projects, last spring, was the coordination of Liip’s involvement at the annual opendata.ch conference. No, I cannot communicate about anything if I don’t understand it! Otherwise I would write complete bulls**t, people would notice it and Liip would lose all credibility on the subject. In other words, I had to know what I was talking about in order to be able to talk about it.

Fear & suspicion, people will be stalking me and CFF tickets will get more expensive

I used to completely disagree on any kind of open data. I mean, why, on Earth, would I be okay to share my personal data with the rest of the world?
Seriously, I was sure that, if I collaborate with the CFF surveys, tickets will get more expensive between Geneva and Lausanne, because they will know my commuting habits. I was convinced that Swisscom will soon be selling my personal data to private polls. If I use a MBudget Card, some people will be stalking me as they know that I always go grocery shopping at the same Migros.

Fear brings fear. It is a major impediment to anything innovative and to any kind of change. The first step to any change of perspective was me realizing that my reaction was based on some purely irrational feeling instead of rational information.

Let’s get started with some reading!

Knowledge the best enemy of fear: What is actually ‘open data’ ?

My education to open data started with learning about the projects that Liip developed (like the open data catalogue of the city of Zurich or the project with the Swiss Federal Archive). I discussed with my colleagues, but the concept of open data remained difficult to grasp.
What is concretely open data?

Step 1: A definition:

The definition of open data as given by the opendefinition.org

“Open data and content can be freely used, modified, and shared by anyone for any purpose”

As it is very general, the full open definition gives a detailed list of attributes. It is a bit of an unfriendly reading, the open data handbook provides a summary of the most important aspects:

“Availability and Access: the data must be available as a whole and at no more than a reasonable reproduction cost, preferably by downloading over the internet. The data must also be available in a convenient and modifiable form.
Re-use and Redistribution: the data must be provided under terms that permit re-use and redistribution including the intermixing with other datasets.
Universal Participation: everyone must be able to use, re-use and redistribute – there should be no discrimination against fields of endeavor or against persons or groups. For example, ‘non-commercial’ restrictions that would prevent ‘commercial’ use, or restrictions of use for certain purposes (e.g. only in education), are not allowed.”

The important thing to remember is that it is a type of content completely available to anyone – public or private sector or even an anonymous quidam – and for any kind of purpose.

Step 2: Private data is not public data

I find important to differentiate between private and public data. When I heard about open data, I felt my privacy instantly threatened. However, opening public data poses no threat to my privacy.
Take the example of cadastral plans, they are available on request. A formal petition to the right administrative service would provide you the info. Opening cadastral plans merely mean saving people working with it the time necessary for the administrative hurdle.

In other words public data is often already available through an administrative process and in an inconvenient format. Opening public data mostly signifies processing and editing them in a convenient format and leaving them in a digital library. Opening public data is about creating a digital library, allowing people to find them without the administrative process.

Private data is one’s individual data, for example, the data-gathered by your period application, your MBudget card, your mobile phone’s GPS tracking. This data is usually under confidentiality.

Opening private data, is not only about making it accessible, but also about editing it, to make sure that it cannot be linked to anyone.

What if open data was beneficial to the community?

Commuting to Geneva, I used to be angry with the CFF, because my Intercity Train was poorly connected to my inter-regio train which lead to me losing 15 to 20 minutes twice a day. Spending 2 hours, 2 hours 30 minutes or 3 hours to commute makes a huge difference. What if the CFF knew that a significant amount of commuters take these same trains as I did? They could delay the train 5 minutes and I would be happier everyday because my travel would be shorter! What if a mobile company shared its data about the mobility of people and made these data available to the CFF? What if I answered the poll? Or better, what if, instead of spending money on a poll, the CFF could access data of commuters? The data quality might be higher and more relevant!

Urbanism: Pully as a case study

The city of Pully is pioneering in the domain with its urban project in collaboration with Swisscom. The project team is analysing the traffic – car, public transportation, bike or pedestrian – based on data provided by Swisscom’s mobile network. (More info in French about this project).
The city of Pully saved the investment necessary for a poll and had reliable data available. Processed to be anonymized, this kind of data is not a threat to my privacy. In this case, opening the data is beneficial to the whole community.
The objective of this project is to develop the urbanisation of the city according to people’s real needs and not to any lobby. It could result in the creation of bike lanes or an improvement of traffic flows.

Pully – Photo Credit l’Avenue Digital Media

Conclusion : open data supports innovation

Sometimes I hear people disagreeing strongly against the concept of open data. I hear fear and threat. The discussion very often goes towards an emotional level rather than staying pragmatic. I find it difficult to rationally fight against emotional argument. First of all, I wish people against open data could make the difference between public and private data. Opening public data means the digitalisation of an already existing public data, ultimately saving public institution’s time.
Secondly, I wish they could realise that sharing information is beneficial to the community. The potential benefit of open data is greater than its threat. Opening data means, processing data, editing and anonymising it to make it available. Open data is the necessary basis of innovation and of a general increase of our quality of life.

At the moment, data can be made available, mostly by investing money (for a poll or negotiating with a company belonging data). In other words, universities, start-ups or associations are restricted to the data they can find or buy. Do we want to live in a world where innovation is driven by companies having the budget to pay for data?

Further Information:

Listen to this podcast, welcoming Pia Waugh, an open data expert and advocate who explains all to Genevieve Jacobs on ABC Radio Canberra.

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Embracing the opposite – Andy Yen and Bertrand Piccard at #ICTimpuls16

I quickly rushed to Lucerne this afternoon for the ICTimpuls16-track about how to succeed with selling Swiss ICT services and products abroad. And for Bertrand Piccard’s keynote – it was worth the time.

Andy Yen of Geneva (and San Francisco) based ProtonMail gave a very encouraging speech about how to present one’s company and products in a different market like the U.S. – it’s basically all about being way more bold than we are used in Swiss culture, embracing risk, and seeking to fail as fast as possible. By investing in sales in the U.S., ProtonMail actually “got the rest of the world for free”. My question, if ProtonMail is also active in other domains of myData than e-mail, or considering to move into that direction, Andy answered in the affarmative. I am very much looking forward to what’s coming there in the future. Thanks, Andy, for your great insights!

(no picture)

I would have liked to post a picture of one of Andy’s slides here, but it’s written “confidential” on them – don’t know, how serious he is about that.

Bertrand Piccard – on the big stage – managed to catch the attention of the audience masterly. A psychiatrist by formation, and a leader by talent he inspired my thoughts throughout his speech. Betrand advocated for always changing one’s altitude to be able to find solutions. Surrounding oneself with less of the same, more divers people surely is supporting that. To be innovative and creative, one has to drop ballast – one’s beliefs, certitudes – and try the opposite. Erradicating emotions and applying a pragmatic attitude can help. Being innovative is not tied to achieving something spectacular, but allowing and fostering to think in other directions. “If one accepts a crisis, it becomes an adventure – if one does not, it stays a crisis”. Life is less about what I know, but more about my doubts and being able to ask questions.

Betrand ended with asking the audiance: “What story do you want to tell? What’s your dream?” I bet everyone in the room was thinking about what ballast one could drop to reach one’s dream. Listening to critical voices helps you in answering that decisive question. Thanks, Bertrand, for your continuous engagement in making our world more energy efficient!

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The fears about innovation and Users’ loyalty – how can a UXer help? Part 2/2

Innovation and changes are risky meanwhile necessary. UXers can support change and deal with risk management. Discover in 3 steps, how UX can help dealing with these fears… and help bringing innovation.

In my last blog post, we realized that companies are faced with an ambiguous situation, between innovation and users loyalty. Meanwhile users want  cutting the edge experiences and dislike learning news things.

1: Deal with these bad feelings concerning change in companies

I have bad news. If your company is struggling at innovating, maybe it is because it is excellent at killing good innovation ideas. Big companies are expected to innovate, but managing people in such companies just freak out at the simple idea of dealing with edgy ideas.

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The fears about innovation and Users’ loyalty – how can a UXer help? Part 1/2

Innovation – what a buzzword! The request for innovation is everywhere, in every request for proposal, even on the lips of some end users. As if companies that do not innovate go bankrupt. End users want exciting experience, and reject change at the same time. It is an ambiguous situation.

Let’s innovate while keeping users happy ! But how?

Innovation: Risky but necessary

Innovation is everywhere! Is every existing thing not good enough and has to be improved? As if we required on a daily basis cutting the edge and exciting experiences! May it be only for pouring coffee in our mugs, or for giving feedbacks to developers who implemented what we co-designed with a client, or for completing a survey, booking a room, making a conference call…

The users of a product know what’s wrong with a product, what is not working properly, what takes too much time. In other words, they know what could be improved. It might be risky  for a company to take the leap, because end users might dislike the change.

Continue reading about The fears about innovation and Users’ loyalty – how can a UXer help? Part 1/2

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When Innovation Exceeds the User Need – The iCloud Case Study

Yesterday I saw a video about a talk given by Johnny Chung Lee, a Human Computer Interaction researcher currently working at Google on the Project Tango platform, at Stanford HCI Seminar – «Interface Technologies That Have Not Yet Left the Lab». I was impressed about the amount of extraordinary ideas which still haven’t reached the market. For many of them the time hasn’t yet come. Though as Johnny Lee mentions, one of the reasons why they may fail is the lack of good Experience Design. Interfaces are there to capture the user need. Technologically driven people still tend to ignore the frustration felt by a user when he/she can’t achieve his/her goal. The over-excitement about new technology blinds them and puts the user into second place. That’s why one should always ask oneself – Why should a user use my product?

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Let’s build the Life Sciences Hub of Europe

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Lift Basel, taking place from 29-30 October 2015, the not-to-be-missed conference connecting Life Sciences and Technology, had one clear message: It is time to innovate and think differently for all stakeholders in order to address the future of health.

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